Danish Siddiqui's Immortal Work

Danish Siddiqui, known for his ground breaking work and soul shattering photography in the times of need, was killed in Afghanistan in July 2021. Here are the stories behind some of his most powerful photographs.

Danish Siddiqui's Immortal Work

Danish Siddiqui, a photojournalist by profession and winner pulitzer Prize for feature photography, was killed in Afghanistan in July 2021 while he was covering the clashes between Taliban and Afghan Forces. He's known for his groundbreaking work and soul-shattering photography in times of need. His unfortunate death is a great loss to real-world journalism. This man of integrity has left us with the greatest work of all time, in the field of journalism. Here are the stories behind some of his most powerful photographs.

He faced the camera Head-On with his 5 year old perched on his shoulders. There was a long walk ahead of them, all the way from Delhi to Madhya Pradesh. Darayam Kushwaha was a migrant worker trying to get home during the national lockdown in 2020.  And the city shuttered, these workers cycled and hitch-hiked for days. But many never made it back home.

He knelt, as though in prayer, as mob hit him with pipes and rods. Siddiqui was covering the riots in Delhi in February 2020. 
When he saw Mohammad Zubair being brutally beaten. 
After taking the photo, he moved away as the mob began noticing him. Two days later he met Zubair and apologised for not being able to help him out there.

This wasn't the end of her journey, but the beginning of her new life. The exhausted woman had fled from Myanmar after the army launched a deadly crackdown on the country's Rohingya Muslims. Siddiqui captured her emotions as she reached the Bangladesh shore in September 2017.
This photo was part of a series that won him the Pulitzer prize in 2018.

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The school bag was open, books were strewn about. The mosquito net was pushed to one side of the bed, waiting for it's occupant to come back. But she didn't. 14 years old Wishmi was one of the hundreds of people killed in the eastern Sunday bombings in Sri Lanka in 2019.
As bombs went off I'm churches and high-end hotels, the Islamic State claimed the attack.

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The gentle blues of breaking dawn. Stood in startling contrast to the blinding flames. As some people were lightly waking up on the left, others were put to sleep on the right. This was Delhi in April 2021. With a deluge of covid-19 fatalities, Delhi was mass cremating its dead. Grieving families waited for hours in line, while others couldn't even afford the last rites.